Estimation of Apolipoprotein A1, Haptoglobin and Alpha 2macroglobulin with some Biochemical Metabolic Markers in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Iraqi Patients

  • hiba abid Al-hussein hassan middle technical university
  • Dawood Salman Dawood Department of Medical Laboratory Science Technology, College of Health &Medical Technology/Baghdad, Middle technical university, Baghdad, Iraq
  • Raghad Jawad Hussein Gastroenterology and Hepatology Teaching Hospital/Baghdad, Iraq
Keywords: Apolipoprotein A1(APO A1), Haptoglobin (Hpt.), Alpha 2macroglobin(A2M), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), metabolic disease

Abstract

"non-alcoholic fatty liver disease" starts with hepatic lipid accumulation and is a dangerous factor for disease development.

Thus, we aimed to determine the serum levels of haptoglobin,alpha2 macroglobulin, apolipoprotein A1, gamma-glutamyl transferase, hemoglobin A1c, Total bilirubin, Triglyceride, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, very low-density lipoprotein, urea, and creatinine among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and healthy individuals. This study was carried out on 60 patients with NAFLD and 30 healthy subjects who were attending the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Teaching Hospital/Baghdad from August /2019 to March /2020. Patients data included age, sex, BMI, and abdominal ultrasound with other medical information. Serum samples were collected and then some biochemical tests were done by an Autoanalyzer, while serum apolipoprotein A1, haptoglobin, and Alpha 2maacroglobulin were measured by ELISA technique.

The study found that obesity (70%) and dyslipidemia (50%) are more common in NAFLD patients than another metabolic disease such as hypertension (20%) and diabetes mellitus (type 1 and 2) (3% and 30%) respectively. Also, the results showed a significant difference among the age group (p=0.006). NAFLD subjects had a highly significant elevation (p=0.000) in the mean ± SD of BMI, FBS, HbA1c, AST, ALP, cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, VLDL, and Alpha 2 macroglobulin compared with the healthy control. Serum ALT and total bilirubin (mean ± SD) were significantly elevated (p=0.001) in   NAFLD subjects (54.28±23.05IU/L and 14.47±9.65 µmole/l respectively) when compared with the mean± SD of healthy control. In addition, the results revealed  a significant elevation (P=0.027) in the mean ± SD of serum albumin in  NAFLD patients when compared with mean ± SD of healthy control and a significant elevation (P=0.002)in the mean ± SD of the LDL of the NAFLD patients as compared to the healthy control.  However, the results showed a highly significant decrease (P=0.000) in the mean ± SD of serum HDL, Apolipoprotein, and haptoglobin. Furthermore, the present study observed that the optimal cut-off value was ≤67.13ng/ml for haptoglobin with a sensitivity and specificity of 80% and 93.33% respectively. In addition, the results revealed that the optimal cut-off value was >257ng/ml for Alpha 2Macroglobulin with a sensitivity and specificity of 73.33% and 86.67% respectively. The study found an optimal cut-off value of ≤86 ng/ml for Apolipoprotein A1 with a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 90% respectively.

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Published
2021-03-30
How to Cite
hassan, hiba, Dawood, D., & Hussein, R. (2021). Estimation of Apolipoprotein A1, Haptoglobin and Alpha 2macroglobulin with some Biochemical Metabolic Markers in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Iraqi Patients. Journal of Techniques, 3(1), 24-30. https://doi.org/10.51173/jt.v3i1.263
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